Rose Petal Jam

Rose Petal Jam with Fresh Rose Petals

Rose Petal Jam is sweet rose-scented heaven! I love floral flavours, particularly rose. They taste wonderful but there is also something romantic and exotic about edible flowers.

I love travelling and one of my favourite places to visit is Morocco. I have had many trips there over the years and have wonderful culinary and cultural memories! Morocco is known for its wonderful roses and rose petals and rose water are used in both sweet and savoury dishes. The province of Ouarzazate, south-east of Marrakesh, is the centre of rose production. Each year in early May in El Kelaa M’Gouna, a small town in the Moroccan “Valley of Roses” there is a Rose Festival to celebrate the annual harvest.

Making Rose Petal Jam reminds me of Moroccan breakfasts and exploring a different culture. However, it also makes me of my own home. I make it using roses from my garden in Gloucestershire and, sometimes, from wild roses that flower in June and July along my regular dog-walking routes.

Rose Petals

What you need to know about Rose Petal Jam

  • What does it taste like? Well, the quick answer is that it tastes of eating roses! It is a sweet, semi-set jam. The petals are not generally removed, although you can do this if you wish, so it has a bit of texture to it too. The long answer is that it tastes of memories, exotic places and also of home (see above!).
  • How do I use it? It is pretty versatile. I’ve listed a few of the ways that I use it below to offer some inspiration!
    • First off, you can use it, as you would any jam, spread on bread and butter for breakfast or as an afternoon snack.
    • It is also great as an accompaniment to cheese. Use it as you would a chutney with hard mild cheese, such as Lancashire or Wensleydale. Drop a spoonful over soft cheese such as ricotta or a good cream cheese. Or drizzle it over fried haloumi.
    • It is also good stirred into plain Greek yogurt or with vanilla ice cream.
    • If you are making pancakes, a dollop of rose petal jam, and maybe a spoonful of whipped cream, will make them taste sublime.
    • It also is a good addition to many plain pudding recipes. Stir it into rice pudding, add it to bread and butter pudding or use a spoonful, together with some whipped cream, to sandwich a pair of meringues.
    • It is good as a filling for cakes, particularly Victoria-sandwich style cakes.
Rose Petal Jam
How do you make it?

It is really quick and easy to make Rose Petal Jam. It takes only 20 minutes and the list of ingredients is very short.

  • The time to make this jam is in the summer when the roses, in your garden or in the hedgerows, are in full bloom. Choose new open flowers – rose buds and older roses that are going brown are not as good. It is best to pick them on a sunny day as the flavour will be stronger. Choose fragrant varieties. The stronger the scent of the roses, the stronger the flavour of the resulting jam.
  • As with all edible flowers, you need to make sure that those that you are gathering have not been treated with any chemicals. Do not ever use roses from a florist as they are very likely to have been chemically treated.
  • There are two views regarding preparation of rose petals for culinary use.The first is that you should not wash the petals s as this will impact the flavour and you should just shake the flowers and pick through them to remove any insects. The second is that the blooms need to be washed to remove the bugs, and any dirt, regardless of any reduction in flavour. I tend towards the “no-wash” view when making this jam but the choice is yours.
  • It is vital to add pectin to this jam (step 5) as your jam will not set without it and it does not occur naturally in rose petals!
  • This jam will keep for around three months. Once you have opened the jar, you should keep it in the refrigerator.

Rose Petal Jam

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Other rose-flavoured recipes

I love the flavour of rose and rose geranium. If you are inspired by my Rose Petal Jam, you might like some of my other rose-flavoured recipes.

Loved this recipe? Checkout the Recipe Index.

Rose Petal Jam

Home-made Rose Petal Jam recipe

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Rose Petal Jam

Rose Petal Jam

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 1 large jar 1x
  • Category: Jam
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This delicious jam is made from fresh rose petals and has an amazing floral taste.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 250 ml (8 fl oz) water
  • 450 g (1 lb) caster sugar
  • 50 g (2 oz) fresh rose petals
  • 100 ml (3 fl oz) pectin
  • Juice of half a lemon

Instructions

  1. Put the water and sugar in a heavy-based pan.   Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Check that the rose petals are free from insects.   You can wash your petals if you wish.   However, to ensure a stronger flavour, it is better not to wash them.
  3. Add the rose petals to the saucepan containing the water and sugar.
  4. Bring the mixture to the boil and then simmer for 10 minutes.
  5. Add the lemon juice and pectin and then pour the mixture into a sterilised jam jar.   Cover with a lid and allow to cool.

Notes

You can sterilise your jam jar by washing it in warm, soapy water, rinsing well and then drying off for 15 minutes in an oven set at 140C/120C fan/gas 1.

Keywords: rose petal, jam

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with Curly’s Cooking  and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday and  Mollie @ Frugal Hausfrau

Rose Petal Jam

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Elderflower Vinegar

Easy Elderflower Vinegar recipe

This recipe for Elderflower Vinegar is incredibly easy. In essence, you just have to combine fresh elderflowers with a light vinegar and leave for two weeks for the flavour to develop. At the end of this time, your vinegar will have the delicious floral scent of elderflowers and will keep indefinitely.

Elderflower vinegar
What you need to know about Elderflower Vinegar
  • The time to make this vinegar is in late spring or early summer when the elderflowers are in bloom. When you start to look for them, you will see them everywhere in hedges in May and June. The elderflower heads consist of hundreds of small creamy-white flowers and have a distinctive elderflower aroma.
  • These are the key points to remember when you are picking your elderflowers. They are best picked on a sunny day as the flavour will be stronger. Choose elderflower heads where the flowers are fully open but which have not yet started to turn brown. As with all foraged food, you need to make sure that the flowers that you are gathering have not been treated with any chemicals.
  • There are two views regarding preparation of elderflowers for use in cordial, gin or vinegar. The first is that you should not wash the elderflowers as this will impact the flavour and you should just shake the flowers and pick through them to remove any insects. The second is that the blooms need to be washed to remove the bugs, and any dirt, regardless of any reduction in flavour. I tend towards the “no-wash” view when making flavoured vinegar, which is strained and has antiseptic properties, but the choice is yours.
  • You can choose any kind of good quality light vinegar to make this recipe. I generally use either white wine vinegar or cider vinegar. However, you can also use rice vinegar. Malt vinegar is too harsh and is not suitable for this recipe.
  • Although it is a matter of minutes to combine the elderflowers with the vinegar, you need to allow two weeks for the flavour to develop. During that time, keep the jar at room temperature, shake it occasionally to ensure the ingredients are combined. If any of the elderflowers are not covered by the vinegar, push them under the surface.
Elderflower vinegar
Uses for Elderflower Vinegar

Elderflower Vinegar can be used as a substitute for non-flavoured vinegar in recipes where its distinctive floral aroma will enhance the taste of the finished dish. I use it in two main ways but I am sure there are lots of others and I would love to hear from anyone who has used it in other ways.

  • I use Elderflower Vinegar is to make a simple vinaigrette salad dressing. Put 50 ml of vinegar and 150 ml of olive oil in a jar together with a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of honey. Close the lid on the jar and shake it for a couple of minutes to combine all the ingredients. I generally use the vinaigrette with salads that contain fruit especially strawberries or melon. Simply combine some green salad leaves, some sliced strawberries or melon and maybe a few cubs of feta and add the dressing.
  • Sprinkling balsamic vinegar onto fresh strawberries is an excellent way of bringing out their flavour. I think using sweetened Elderflower Vinegar is better. I mix 50 ml of vinegar with two teaspoons of honey or sugar and then sprinkle it over the strawberries. You can either eat right away or leave for half an hour so that the vinegar will draw out the delicious strawberry juices.

Loved this recipe? Checkout the Recipe Index.

Other Elderflower Recipes

I am a big fan of elderflower and love its distinctive floral flavour. I have lots of recipes, some using fresh elderflowers and some which can be made with shop-bought elderflower cordial.

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Elderflower vinegar

Elderflower Vinegar

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Total Time: 5 minutes plus 2 weeks to mature
  • Yield: 500 ml 1x
  • Category: Vinegar
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This easy Elderflower Vinegar is a fantastic way of capturing the floral flavour of fresh elderflowers.  Use it in dressings and as a condiment in sweet and savoury dishes.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 500 ml (17 fluid oz) vinegar (eg white wine, cider or rice wine vinegar)
  • 4 heads of fresh elderflower

Instructions

  1. Check that the elderflowers are free from insects.   You can wash your elderflowers if you wish.   However, to ensure a stronger flavour, it is better not to wash them.
  2. Put the elderflowers into a jam jar and cover with the vinegar.  You may need to push them down a bit to ensure that they are completely covered by the vinegar.
  3. Cover the jar with a lid and leave for two weeks for the vinegar to mature at room temperature.   Check every day or so to ensure that the flowers are still covered by the vinegar.
  4. After two weeks, strain the vinegar to remove the elderflowers.  The easiest way to do this is to pour it through a sieve lined with a piece of clean muslin.
  5. The flavoured vinegar will keep indefinitely in a lidded jar or bottle.

Notes

You can easily increase the quantities in this recipe.  The ratio is 4 elderflower heads for each 500 ml of vinegar

Keywords: vinegar, elderflower

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with Apply to Face Blog and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday.

Loved this recipe? Checkout the Recipe Index.

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Easy Mincemeat recipe

Easy, home-made, vegetarian Mincemeat – a traditional seasonal recipe

Mincemeat is a traditional British recipe, consisting of dried fruit, apple, citrus and a good measure of brandy, which is used as a filling for mince pies and other Christmas baked goods. It is sweet, rich, fruity and infused with alcohol.

My mother made mincemeat every Christmas. Her recipe was based on one in an extremely old and battered copy of Mrs Beeton’s Cookery Book, which she always kept to hand in her kitchen. However, she made a few adaptations, such as leaving out the mixed peel because she didn’t like it and adding more brandy for the opposite reason. And I follow her example in this.

My one change to my mother’s recipe is that I use vegetarian suet rather than animal suet. I don’t think it makes any difference to the taste. Mincemeat is a very old recipe, and originally contained meat, and the inclusion of suet was a continuation of this. If you are vegetarian, this recipe has all the taste and no animal products.

Mincemeat

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Home-made Mincemeat – why on earth would you bother?

You may be wondering why you would bother to make your own mincemeat when there are a huge number of good quality jars on your supermarket shelves. You might also think that there are even more packets of mince pies available for you to eat right now without bothering to turn on your oven.

It’s easy

Firstly, it is extremely easy to make your own home-made Mincemeat. In fact, calling it a recipe, is a bit of a stretch as you just mix the various ingredients together and then leave them for the flavours to develop. Mincemeat does not require any cooking as the sugar and brandy transform and combine the other ingredients.

The one point you need to bear in mind is that you need to make the Mincemeat a month before you plan to use it. It needs this time for the brandy to work its magic on the dried fruit. So if you want to make mince-pies for Christmas, you need to be thinking about making your Mincemeat in late November. In fact, traditionally it is made on Stir Up Sunday which is the last Sunday before Advent. In 2020, this is Sunday, 22nd November.

It tastes good and keeps for ages

Secondly, there is absolutely no comparison in terms of taste between the shop bought mincemeat and the one you make at home. Even high quality ready-made versions will have a comparatively high proportion of sugar and a comparatively low proportion of brandy. Yes, even those which state that they contain brandy really do not have very much! Home-made mincemeat is full of flavour as, in addition to the brandy and dried fruit, it has a hit of citrus and spice from the nutmeg and cinnamon.

Home-made mincemeat improves with age. The flavours develop and the brandy preserves the other ingredients. It will keep for at least twelve months.

It is Christmas in a jar…

Thirdly, if you want to get your Christmas baking mojo on, this is absolutely the perfect recipe. With the smell of dried fruit soaked in brandy, you have Christmas right there. You get this when you make the mincemeat and, again, when you use it to make mincepies. Buttery pastry, warmed brandy-soaked fruit – need I say more?

…or under the tree

Fourthly, if you are looking for home-made present ideas, this is a pretty good one. You can dress up the jar with a few ribbons and you are good to go. As there is essentially no skill involved whatsoever, and doing the mixing is quite fun, it is definitely worth considering as a home-made present from children to older relatives. Provided said relatives like mincemeat – probably best to check first.

Mincemeat

Loved this recipe? Checkout the Recipe Index.

Other festive sauces and accompaniments

In my view, any festive celebration is not complete without some warm and fragrant Mince Pies made with home-made vegetarian mincemeat. Having the right sauces and accompaniments can take a festive meal to the next level. If you are preparing a special festive meal for Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year you might like to try some of my other recipes for drinks, snacks, accompaniments and desserts. They are very easy and are a great way to create a celebratory festive feast!

Loved this recipe? Checkout the Recipe Index.

Easy Vegetarian Mincemeat Recipe

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Mincemeat

Easy Mincemeat recipe

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Total Time: 10
  • Category: Pie filling
  • Cuisine: English

Description

With sugar, citrus and dried fruit soaked in brandy, this home-made Mincemeat is Christmas in a jar.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 450 g (1 lb) vegetarian suet
  • 450 g (1 lb) currants
  • 450 g (1 lb) raisins
  • 450 g (1 lb) sultanas
  • 450 g (1 lb) caster sugar (superfine sugar)
  • 1 cooking apple
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 75 ml (3 fl oz) brandy

Mincemeat


Instructions

  1. Put the suet, dried fruit and sugar in a large bowl.
  2. Peel, core and chop the apple and add it to the bowl.
  3. Add the nutmeg, cinnamon and lemon zest.
  4. Pour in the brandy and stir well.
  5. Pack the mixture into sterilised jars.
  6. Place the jars in a cool, dry place and leave for at least a month before using. 
  7. Check the jars every week or so.  If the top of the Mincemeat looks dry, you can top it up with some more brandy.

Mincemeat


Notes

You can sterilise your jar by washing it in warm, soapy water, rinsing well and then drying off for 15 minutes in an oven set at 140C/120C fan/gas 1.   

If (unlike me) you like mixed peel, you can also add 450 g of it to this recipe.

It is easy to scale up this recipe if you want to make more mincemeat.  Simply double or triple the quantities of all the ingredients.

The mincemeat should last for at least six months in its jar.  You can also freeze it – taking it out of the jar and putting it into a freezer-proof container – and it will keep for at least twelve months.

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with LostinFood and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday and  Liz at Spades, Spatulas and Spoons

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Chilli Jam recipe

Home-made Chilli Jam recipe

This easy, home-made Chilli Jam recipe has a fantastic combination of heat tempered by sweetness. You can use this jam as a condiment to add a boost of heat to pretty much anything! Some of my favourite ways to use are listed below.

  • Use in place of a chutney in sandwiches. It is particularly good with cheese or hummus.
  • Drizzle into a baked potato together with a dollop of sour cream;
  • Makes a great dipping sauce for all kinds of things – prawn crackers, chips, prawns, grilled halloumi..
  • Add as an ingredient to liven up your baking – see my recipe for Cheese Muffins with Chilli Jam.

Lots of lovely chillis..

You can use any kind of fresh chillis to make this jam. When choosing your chillis, bear in mind that the heat of the jam will be in direct correlation to the heat of the chillis that you use. If you are a straight-up hot chilli lover, by all means go for the California Reaper! However, if you like a milder punch of heat, go for something a bit less ferocious such as a Habanero. The Scoville Scale measures the heat of chillis and most of those you buy in stores have an indication of their fierceness. I grow my own chillis and the heat thing is sometimes a bit more hit-and-miss – especially when I forget what variety they are!

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Chilli Jam

Chilli Jam recipe

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Category: Jam
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This fiery Chilli Jam combines the heat of fresh chillis with a sweet  jam.  It is perfect for perking up all kinds of savoury dishes as a condiment or an ingredient.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 100 g fresh chillis (red, green or yellow)
  • 100 g fresh red pepper
  • 750 g jam sugar
  • 40 ml cider or wine vinegar

Chillis


Instructions

  1. Finely chop the chillis and the red pepper and remove the seeds.
  2. Put the sugar and vinegar in a heavy-based pan.  Heat gently, without stirring, until the sugar has dissolved.   
  3. Then add the chopped chillis and pepper to the pan.  Increase the heat and cook at a rolling boil for 10 minutes.
  4. Remove the mixture from the pan and blend using a food processor or hand blender.  You should end up with very small pieces of chilli suspended in the jam.   
  5. Pour the jam into a sterilised jar and seal with a lid.Chilli Jam

Notes

You can sterilise your jar by washing it in warm, soapy water, rinsing well and then drying off for 15 minutes in an oven set at 140C/120C fan/gas 1.       

The jam will keep for several months.  Once you  have opened the jar, keep it in the fridge.

Keywords: jam, chilli,

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare at EasyPeasyFoodie

Loved this recipe? You may also like the following recipes. Or checkout the Recipe Index.

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Easy Lemon Curd Recipe

Easy, home-made Lemon Curd

This Easy Lemon Curd Recipe will enable you to make fresh, zesty lemon curd in a matter of minutes. It is so easy to make and is totally different from over-sweetened shop-bought lemon curd which just does not have anything like the same level of sharp lemony flavour. This is one of those recipes where the minimal effort really pays off with a product that is so much better than the ready-made version.

Many people think it is hard to make Lemon Curd and worry about ending up with lemon-flavoured scrambled eggs rather than smooth curd. Do not worry! The acid in the lemon juice prevents the eggs scrambling when they are heated. All you need to do is cook over a low heat and make sure you stir the mixture while it is thickening. The whole recipe only takes around 10 minutes – quicker than going down to the shops to buy a jar of ready-made Lemon Curd.

You can make Curd from a number of other tropical fruit such as lime, orange, mango and passion fruit. I think it works best with strongly flavoured fruit – if you are a fan of rhubarb, have a look at my recipe for Rhubarb Curd.

There are so many uses for Easy Lemon Curd..

So what can you do with Lemon Curd? Well, lots and lots of things, actually! First off, it is great as a spread on bread as an alternative to jam or honey. It is also great stirred into plain yogurt or spooned over vanilla ice cream. However, in my opinion, it really comes into its own as a cooking ingredient. Its punch of lemony flavour is fantastic in all kinds of sweet dishes. It is particularly useful as a filling for cakes and in all kinds of puddings.

Other lemon-flavoured recipes

Lemon is one of my favourite flavours. I will always go for the lemon cake rather than the chocolate cake! If you like lemon too, you might like my Lemon Pavlova or easy Lemon Curd Ice Cream, both of which use my home-made Lemon Curd. Or you could check out some of my other lemon-flavoured recipes such as my Lemon Drizzle Cake, Lemon Biscuits and Lemon Verbena Ice Cream.

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Lemon Curd

Easy Lemon Curd Recipe

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 5
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 300 ml lemon curd 1x
  • Category: Curd
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This Easy Lemon Curd Recipe is fool-proof and only takes ten minutes.  In less time than it takes to go to the shop to buy ready-made Lemon Curd, you can have the far superior zesty, lemony home-made version.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 unwaxed lemons
  • 85 g butter
  • 225 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs

Lemon Curd


Instructions

  1. Finely grate the zest of the lemons into a small, heavy-based saucepan.
  2. Squeeze the lemons and add their juice to the saucepan together with the butter and sugar.
  3. Beat the eggs and add these to the saucepan.
  4. Put the saucepan over a very low heat and stir until the butter has melted and the ingredients have combined.
  5. Continue stirring over the low heat until the mixture has thickened.  This should take around five minutes.
  6. Pour the mixture into sterilised jam jars and allow to cool.

Lemon Curd


Notes

Make sure you use unwaxed lemons which are available in most supermarkets.  You want lemon zest rather than wax in your curd!

Don’t worry about ending up with scrambled eggs!  The acid in the lemon juice will prevent this.

You can sterilise your jam jars by washing them in warm, soapy water, rinsing well and then drying off for 15 minutes in an oven set at 140C/120C fan/gas 1.

The lemon curd will keep for three weeks in the refridgerator.

Keywords: lemon curd, curd

Loved this recipe? You may also like the following recipes. Or checkout the Recipe Index.

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