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Ginger Biscuits (Ginger Cookies)

Easy Ginger Biscuits (Ginger Cookies)

These easy Ginger Biscuits are a bit different from a traditional ginger cookie or ginger biscuit recipe. I think of them as a cross between a flapjack and a brandy-snap. They are very quick to bake, only 10 minutes in the oven, and have a base of oats with sugar and butter, a small amount of flour and an egg. The ginger flavour comes from finely chopped pieces of stem ginger that are added to the mixture. Flaked almonds also give a bit of extra crunch and nuttiness.

This recipe is based on one that my mother used to make. She used candied peel, rather than stem ginger, in her recipe. I am not a huge fan of candied peel and I had a half-used jar of stem ginger left over from Christmas so I decided to try make a ginger-flavoured version. I was also looking for a baking recipe that did not use a lot of flour as I am finding it hard to get hold of this at the moment.

These Ginger Biscuits have a subtle ginger flavour which even those who are not big ginger fans seem to like. The biscuits themselves are chewy with a bit of crunch around the edges and are sweet and buttery.

Things you need to know about these Ginger Biscuits (Ginger Cookies)
  • They are very quick and easy to make. Just mix all the ingredients together and pop them in the oven for 10 minutes.
  • The only slightly tricky stage is getting the cooked biscuits off the baking tray. The key is to make sure that the baking tray is very well greased and that you do not try and take the biscuits off immediately they come out of the oven (they will be too soft) or leave it too long (they will be welded to the baking tray!). If you leave it for about 5 minutes, that is just about right and it should be quite straightforward to get them off.
  • Don’t leave out the pinch of salt. It makes a big difference to the taste of the biscuits as it balances out the sweetness.
  • They are very versatile. Have them with a cup of morning coffee or afternoon tea. Add them to lunch boxes. Or they are also a very nice addition to a bowl of ice cream.
  • I used stem ginger for this recipe. This is candied ginger in its own syrup which you can buy in most supermarkets. It is one of my favourite ingredients as a little goes a long way and, in addition to the globes of sweet ginger, you can also use the syrup as a flavouring. However, if you do not have stem ginger to hand, you could use pieces of crystallised ginger which can be found in the baking aisle in most supermarkets.
  • If ginger is not your thing, you could substitute the stem ginger for the same amount of mixed peel. Or you could just leave out the ginger and you would still have a delicious, oaty, buttery biscuit.
Other teatime treats

If you are a fan of ginger, you might like my Ginger and Pear Cake or Gingerbread Loaf Cake . If you are in the mood for a different kind of biscuit, you could try my Lavender Shortbread or Lemon Biscuits. Or if you are a savoury kind of person then Cheese Biscuits might hit the spot. I also have a lot of recipes for very easy loaf cakes including St Clement’s Cake, Apple Cake, Coconut Cake, Blood Orange Cake, Cherry and Almond Cake, Earl Grey Cake, Latte Cake with Salted Caramel, Lavender Cake, Lemon Drizzle Cake, Rhubarb Crumble Cake and Rum Banana Bread.

Ginger Biscuits
How to make Ginger Biscuits (Ginger Cookies)

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Ginger Biscuits

Ginger Biscuits (Ginger Cookies)

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: About 30 biscuits or cookies 1x
  • Category: Biscuits
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: English

Description

These quick and easy Ginger Biscuits (or Ginger Cookies) are crisp and buttery with a subtle note of ginger.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 100 g (4 oz) rolled oats

  • 100 g (4 oz) soft brown sugar

  • 100 g (4 oz) caster sugar

  • 1 tablespoon flour

  • 25 g  (1 oz) flaked almonds
  • Salt

  • 100 g (4 oz) butter

  • 1 egg
  • 50 g (2 oz) stem ginger

     


Instructions

  1. Set your oven to 170 C, 325 F or Gas Mark 3.
  2. Line two baking sheets with baking parchment.  Pour half a teaspoon of vegetable oil onto each sheet and spread over the entire surface using your fingers or a pastry brush.
  3. Put the rolled oats, soft brown sugar, caster sugar, flour, almonds and a pinch of salt into a large mixing bowl.
  4. Melt the butter in a microwave or in a small saucepan.  Add the melted butter to the dry ingredients.  Then stir in the egg.
  5. Finely chop the stem ginger and add it to the mixture.
  6. Drop teaspoons of the mixture onto the prepared baking sheets making sure that you leave a four centimetre gap between each one as they will spread out when they are in the oven.
  7. Put the baking sheets into the oven for 10-12 minutes.
  8. Remove the baking sheets from the oven and allow the biscuits to cool on them for five minutes before removing them with a palette knife or spatula.  Place them on a baking rack to cool completely.

Ginger Biscuits


Keywords: biscuits, cookies, ginger, easy

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with Recipes Made Easy and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday and Antonia @ Zoale.com and Zeba @ Food For The Soul.

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Lavender shortbread, lavender cookies, lavender biscuits, lavender hearts
Lavender shortbread
Ginger and Pear Cake
Ginger and Pear Cake

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Nettle Soup

Nettle Soup – easy, cheap, seasonal and nutritious

This easy, cheap and nutritious Nettle Soup is made using common or garden stinging nettles. These are combined with onions and potatoes to create a simple and tasty soup that can be eaten either hot or cold. I think it is a refreshing and tasty cold soup to eat for lunch on a hot day.

Cooked stinging nettles are delicious and taste similar to spinach. In fact they can be used as a substitute in any spinach-based recipes. They have been used as a foraged ingredient for hundreds of years. Stinging nettles are also very healthy. They contain a wide range of nutrients, including Vitamins A, C and K, and are very rich in iron. In addition to culinary use, they were also used to treat a range of ailments including eczema, arthritis and anaemia. As nettles start to appear in April, they were traditionally picked as a “spring tonic”, full of leafy, green goodness after a restricted winter diet.

Nettle Soup
What you need to know about eating stinging nettles!
  • Stinging nettles sting because the hairs on their leaves contain formic acid. Heat neutralises this so that cooked nettles will not sting you. I have been told that you can eat raw nettles if you pulverise them in a blender or mortar and pestle but I have never tried this!
  • Cooked stinging nettles taste similar to spinach and can be used as a substitute in any spinach-based recipes. I think they taste fresher and have a bit more substance than spinach.
  • It is essential that you only pick stinging nettles, or any other foraged food, that you are certain has not been treated with pesticides, herbicides or any other chemicals. If you have them in your garden, that is ideal. If you are sourcing them elsewhere, I would recommend picking those that are not just by a footpath used by dog walkers.
  • You need to wash the nettles thoroughly before you use them in order to ensure that any dirt or small insects are removed. I generally put the nettles into a large bowl of cold water for about ten minutes and then rinse them a couple of times before using.
  • You need to take care when you are picking the nettles and also when you are washing them. Until they are cooked, they will still sting. I use gardening gloves (for the picking) and washing up gloves (for the cleaning).
  • The stalks of the stinging nettles can be tough and fibrous. For most recipes, it is best to only use the leaves, which you will need to carefully remove from the stems before cooking, or the new growth at the very top of the nettle.
  • As with any foraged food, stinging nettles are zero cost – particularly, if like me, you have a lot in your garden – and have zero food miles.
Nettle Soup
Other easy vegetarian soup recipes

I have lots of easy, vegetarian soup recipes. If you like this Nettle Soup, you might like some of the others. All my soups are vegetarian and all can be made vegan by substituting animal fats, such as butter, for vegetable fats. Some of them are pretty simple such as Fennel SoupJerusalem Artichoke Soup  or Sweetcorn Chowder and showcase a single vegetable. Others combine vegetables which have complimentary flavours such as Curried Parsnip and Apple SoupMoroccan Spiced Sweet Potato SoupCeleriac and Apple SoupMushroom and Chestnut SoupPumpkin and Sweetcorn Soup or Leek and Potato Soup. A few have more unusual combinations of flavours such as Beetroot Soup with Coconut or Butternut and Peanut Butter Soup. I also have a few chilled soup recipes, which are fantastic cold in the summer, but can also be served warm such as Asparagus and Pea and Tomato.

Other foraged ingredients

I really love using foraged ingredients in my cooking. What’s not to like about fresh, tasty, free food with zero food miles? I tend to go for things that are easy to identify for someone, like me, who has very little botanical knowledge!

In April, when there are loads of dandelions in my garden, I make Dandelion Syrup which is a really cheap and easy vegan alternative to honey and can be used on waffles or pancakes or as a cooking ingredient. In May and June, I pick elderflowers and use them to make Elderflower Cordial and Elderflower Gin. The cordial, in addition to being a lovely drink, is a really useful cooking ingredient and can be used as a flavouring in lots of recipes. I use it to make Elderflower and Lemon Cupcakes, Elderflower Ice Cream and Gooseberry and Elderflower Sorbet and Elderflower Pannacotta.

I also forage amongst the cultivated plants in my garden, particularly for edible flowers. In April, I used lilac to make Lilac Cake and Lilac Sugar, Honey and Syrup. Later in the summer, in June and July, I will use lavender to make all sorts of recipes such as Lavender Ice Cream, Lavender Cake, Lavender Sugar, Lavender Shortbread and Lavender Scones.

How to make Nettle Soup
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Nettle Soup

Nettle Soup

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 6 1x
  • Category: Soup
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This simple, easy, healthy and cheap soup combines nettles with onions and potatoes.  


Scale

Ingredients

  • 50 g butter or 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil
  • 2 large onions
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 large potatoes
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 litre vegetable stock
  • 100 g stinging nettles
  • A little double cream (optional)
  • Some chopped chives (optional)

Nettle Soup


Instructions

  1. Heat the butter or oil in a heavy-based saucepan or casserole.

  2. Peel and roughly chop the onions and add them to the saucepan. Season with salt and pepper and very gently fry them for around 15 minutes until they are soft and sweet.   It is really important to add seasoning at this point and to cook gently to bring out the flavour of the vegetables – it will make a huge difference to the taste of your soup.

  3. Peel and chop the potatoes and add them to the saucepan.  Then add the peeled and crushed garlic cloves.  Continue to cook slowly for a further 5 minutes.

  4. Then add the vegetable stock to the saucepan.  Bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes.

  5. Wash your nettles thoroughly.  Remove any thick stalks.  Add the leaves and thinner stalks to the saucepan.  Cook gently for a further 5 minutes until the potatoes have softened.

  6. Turn off the heat and allow the soup to cool slightly before blending.

  7. When you are ready to serve, you can add a swirl of double cream and a sprinkle of chopped chives to the top of each bowl.

     

    Nettle Soup


Notes

It is really important that you pick nettles that you know are free from pesticides or herbicides and that you wash and prepare them carefully.  See blog post for instructions.

You can serve this soup hot or cold.  If you want to serve it cold, you may wish to thin it out by adding a little fluid.  You can use more stock or, alternatively, use water or milk. 

This soup is vegetarian and can be vegan if you use vegetable oil rather than butter and omit the cream or use a non-dairy alternative.

Keywords: nettles, stinging nettles, soup, foraged food, food for free, vegetarian

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with Tin and Thyme and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday and Mollie @Frugal Hausfrau

Loved this recipe? See the Recipe Index for lots of other tasty recipes!
Dandelion honey
Dandelion Jelly
Gin and elderflowers
Elderflower gin
Elderflower cordial
Elderflower Cordial

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Easy Coconut Cake

Easy Coconut Cake recipe

This easy Coconut Cake recipe produces a wonderful moist cake. It has lots of layers of coconut flavour as it includes desiccated coconut, coconut cream and coconut flavouring. It is topped with coconut-flavoured buttercream and decorated with a sprinkle of desiccated coconut.

I regularly make a Coconut and Lime Drizzle cake but wanted to make a cake which had a full-on coconut flavour. This cake is somehow softer, both in flavour and in texture. I think it is perfect if you are looking to do a bit of comfort eating. I also think it looks very attractive, in an understated, white-on-white way.

What you need to know about making my easy Coconut Cake
  • First off, it is very quick and easy. After all, the clue is in the title. It is a simple loaf cake which means that it is cooked in 45 minutes. However, you do need to wait until the cake is completely cool before you add the icing. Therefore, you may want to make it a few hours ahead. It is fine to make it the day before you want to eat it. Once cooled, wrap it in foil and then ice it the next day.
  • It uses various elements to create the full-0n celebration of coconut. There is desiccated coconut in the cake mix but I also use coconut flavouring. Many supermarkets produce this and it is worth seeking out a good quality one. I think it adds that extra hit of coconut. I also use coconut cream, rather than ordinary milk, to loosen up the cake mix. Again, this adds another layer of flavour. Coconut cream is used again in the buttercream icing.
  • You can keep the iced cake for a two or three days, wrapped in foil, but like all home-made sponge cakes it is best within a day or so. You can freeze it, wrapped in foil and then placed in a freezer bag, for up to three months.
  • I think of this as a typical cake to eat with your morning coffee or afternoon tea. However, I have used it as a dessert, with a scoop of coconut ice-cream for a full-on coconut experience!
Other loaf cakes

I love making loaf cakes. They are quick, easy, versatile and do not require any extra icing or decoration (unless you want to do it). If you want a basic everyday cake, look no further than a loaf cake. They are also a great base for experimenting with flavours which is a big reason for me to love them! Here are some of my favourites.

Easy Coconut Cake recipe

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Coconut Cake

Easy Coconut Cake

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 1 loaf cake (serves 6-8) 1x
  • Category: Cake
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This quick and easy Coconut Loaf Cake, topped with coconut butter cream, is perfect with morning coffee or afternoon tea.

Coconut Cake


Scale

Ingredients

For the cake

  • 125 g (5 oz) butter
  • 175 g (7 oz) caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 150 g (6 oz) self-raising flour
  • 25 g (1 oz) desiccated coconut
  • 80 ml (3 fl oz) coconut cream
  • 2 teaspoons coconut flavouring

For the icing

  • 200 g (8 oz) icing sugar
  • 80 ml (3 fl oz) coconut cream
  • 100 g (4 oz) butter
  • 1 teaspoon coconut flavouring
  • A little desiccated coconut to decorate


Instructions

  1. Set your oven to 180 degrees centigrade, 350 degrees fahrenheit or Gas Mark 4.
  2. Grease a 450 g (1 lb) loaf tin and line the bottom with baking parchment.
  3. Cream the butter with the sugar.  (I usually soften the butter for about 30 seconds in the microwave first as it makes it much easier)
  4. Gradually add the eggs to the butter and sugar mixture.  If it looks as if it is going to curdle, add some of the self-raising flour.
  5. Once the eggs have been incorporated add the rest of the self-raising flour.
  6. Add the desiccated coconut, coconut cream and coconut flavouring.  Mix to combine.
  7. Spoon the cake mixture into your prepared loaf tin.
  8. Put the tin in the oven and bake for 45 minutes.
  9. Remove the cake from the oven and place on a baking rack to cool.
  10. Prepare the icing by combining the icing sugar, coconut cream, butter and coconut flavouring in a food processor, or by beating by hand, until you have smooth paste.  
  11. When the cake is completely cool.  Remove from the cake tin and spread the icing on top of it.  You can sprinkle a little desiccated coconut on top to decorate.

Keywords: coconut, loaf cake, cake, easy

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with Lost in Food and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday and [email protected] and Greens and [email protected], Spatulas and Spoons

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Lime Cheesecake
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St Clement’s Cake

St Clement’s Cake – easy orange and lemon cake

St Clement’s Cake is an easy loaf cake flavoured with fresh orange and lemon. It is a variant on a drizzle cake, as the citrus juices, mixed with icing sugar, are poured on to the warm cake. When cooled, this gives makes the cake extra zesty and moist with a sugary topping.

I love drizzle cakes and often make both Lemon Drizzle and Orange Drizzle. This cake resulted from an idea to do a combination. I think it works well as the orange adds extra flavour to the sharp lemon. If you have ever been avoiding alcohol and have ordered a St. Clement’s, consisting of half and half lemonade and orange juice, in an English pub or bar then you will have an idea of how this cake will taste.

St Clement's Cake
In praise of citrus

I am a huge fan of citrus flavours in baking and desserts. If you like those zesty flavours too, here are some pointers.

  • The flavour of citrus fruits is concentrated in the zest rather than in the juice. Grated citrus zest is a brilliant way to get maximum flavour into your food. However, make sure that you buy unwaxed fruit and that you wash it before grating. Also, use a fine grater as you do not want big lumps of zest in your cake. Stop grating when you get to the white pith, underneath the zest, as this is bitter and does not add anything to the flavour.
  • You can adapt many recipes to use different types of citrus fruits. I have a number of variations on a Lemon Drizzle Cake including Blood Orange Drizzle Cake and Lime and Coconut Drizzle Cake. However, the amount of juice produced by one kind of citrus fruit may be less than another and some are more acid than others. For example, if you are substituting limes for lemons, you will need double the number.
  • Citrus juice, as well as adding some flavour and sourness, also has other very useful properties. For example, when making Lime Cheesecake, it is the chemical reaction between the lime juice and the dairy products that causes the cheesecake mixture to set.
Other citrus baking and dessert recipes
St Clement's Cake
Why St Clement’s?

In case you are wondering, the name comes from the 18th century English nursery rhyme and folk song which refers to the bells of a number of churches situated near the City of London. The first verse is Oranges and lemons say the bells of St. Clement’s. I have happy memories of singing this song as a child and, more recently, with my own children. I am also a born and bred Londoner who worked in the City for many years and was delighted to find many of the churches that are mentioned in the song still standing. The full lyrics are included below.

Oranges and lemons,
Say the bells of St. Clement’s

You owe me five farthings,
Say the bells of St. Martin’s

When will you pay me?
Say the bells at Old Bailey

When I grow rich,
Say the bells at Shoreditch

When will that be?
Say the bells of Stepney

I do not know,
Says the great bell at Bow

Here comes a candle to light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head!
Chop chop chop chop the last man is dead

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St Clement's Cake

St Clement’s Cake

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 1 loaf cake (serves 6-8) 1x
  • Category: Cake
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: English

Description

This quick and easy St Clement’s Cake is flavoured with zesty fresh orange and lemon.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 125 g butter 
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 175 g self-raising flour
  • 4 tablespoons of milk
  • 1 lemon and 1 orange (both unwaxed and washed)
  • 200 g icing sugar

St Clement's Cake


Instructions

  1. Set your oven to 180 degrees centigrade or Gas Mark 4.
  2. Grease a 450 g loaf tin and line the bottom with baking parchment.
  3. Cream the butter with the sugar.  (I usually soften the butter for about 30 seconds in the microwave first as it makes it much easier.)
  4. Gradually add the eggs to the butter and sugar mixture.  If it looks as if it is going to curdle, add some of the self-raising flour.
  5. Once the eggs have been incorporated add the rest of the self-raising flour.
  6. Add the milk and the grated zest of your lemon and orange.
  7. Spoon the cake mixture into your prepared loaf tin.
  8. Put the tin in the oven and bake for 45 minutes.
  9. While the cake is baking, put the juice from your orange and your lemon in a small saucepan.  Heat gently with the lid off until the liquid is reduced by half.  Then add the icing sugar to form a thick syrup.
  10. Remove the cake from the oven and immediately pour the syrup over the top.
  11. Leave the cake in the tin to cool completely before removing.   If you try and take it out while it is still warm it may fall apart as it will be very moist due to the syrup.

St Clement's Cake


Keywords: cake, orange, lemon, loaf cake, St Clement’s

This recipe has been shared on #CookBlogShare with Curly’s Cooking and #Fiesta Friday with Fiesta Friday and Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Laurena @ Life Diet Health

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Asparagus and Pea Soup with Chervil

Asparagus and Pea Soup with Chervil

This Asparagus and Pea Soup is an easy and versatile spring or summer recipe.   It can be served either hot or cold and works well as a light lunch or supper or as a first course at a dinner party.

I make lots of soups in autumn and winter – a home-made vegetable soup is one of my favourite lunches – but not so many in spring and summer.  However, I have a few soups in my repertoire, like this Asparagus and Pea Soup (and also my Leek and Potato Soup with Fresh Chives) which are just as good, or better, eaten cold rather than hot.  This is fantastic in a typical English summer, with variable weather, as you don’t know when you are making the soup whether you will need warming up with a piping hot bowl or cooling down!

In praise of fresh herbs

I use chervil, which has a delicate aniseed flavour, in this soup.   It is one of my favourite summer herbs and is very easy to grow and will flourish in your garden or in a pot on your window-ledge.   If you don’t grow it yourself, it may be hard to source and dill, which also has an aniseed flavour, or parsley or chives are good substitutes. A sprinkle of fresh herbs are a brilliant way of enhancing both the flavour and the look of a home-made soup.

Other asparagus recipes

If you love asparagus, you might also like my Asparagus and Herb Cheese Tart and my Asparagus Quiche.

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Asparagus Soup

Asparagus and Pea Soup with Chervil

  • Author: Tastebotanical
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: for 6 people 1x
  • Category: Soup
  • Cuisine: English

Description

Delicious and versatile, as it can be eaten hot or cold, this Asparagus and Pea Soup, enhanced with fresh Chervil, is perfect for a light lunch or as a first course at a summer dinner party.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 onion
  • 2 large potatoes
  • 50 g (2 oz) butter
  • 250 g (8 oz) fresh asparagus
  • 2 teaspoons of vegetable bouillon or stock powder
  • 500 ml (1 pint) water
  • 175 g (6 oz) frozen peas (defrosted)
  • A little milk to thin the soup – around 250 ml (Half a pint)
  • A bunch of chervil (or parsley or dill)
  • A little double cream to serve

Instructions

  1. Peel and chop the onion and the potatoes and put the pieces in a large pan with the butter.   Fry gently for about 5 minutes until the vegetables have softened.
  2. Remove the ends of the asparagus stems as these can be woody and difficult to eat. The best way of doing this is to simply bend the stem and it will snap at the right point.
  3. Once you have removed the woody ends from the asparagus, cut the tip off each spear and set aside.  Then chop the stalks into 1 cm sections.
  4. Add the pieces of chopped asparagus stalk to the pan with the onion and potato pieces.  Add 500 ml of water and 2 teaspoons of vegetable bouillon or stock powder.
  5. Simmer for around 15 minutes until all the vegetables are cooked.
  6. Then add the frozen peas and cook for a further 2 minutes.
  7. Put the soup into a blender (or use a hand blender) and process until smooth.
  8. Return the soup to the large pan.  Add sufficient milk to thin the soup to the desired consistency – you may either want a thicker, chunkier soup or a thinner one.
  9. If you plan to serve the soup hot, put the reserved asparagus tips into the soup and they will cook in it while it is reheated.   If you plan to serve the soup cold, it is best to steam the asparagus tips separately for 5 minutes and then add them to the soup just before serving.
  10. Serve topped with chopped chervil, or alternatively parsley, and a swirl of cream.

Notes

This soup is very versatile and can be served either hot or cold.

Keywords: asparagus and pea soup, asparagus, chervil, cold soup

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Leek and Potato Soup
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